Country Holidays

Anzac Day

Anzac Day symbolizes the sacrifices made by soldiers from Australia and New Zealand. Anzac means "Australian and New Zealand Army Corps."

In Australia and New Zealand, Anzac Day celebrates “all Australians and New Zealanders who have served and died in all wars, conflicts, and peacekeeping operations” that have taken place since 1914. It also commemorates the first major military action fought by the nation.

Read Also: Day of the Dead

History Of Anzac Day

Anzac Day was first observed in 1916, one year after the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps (ANZAC) landed at Gallipoli, Turkey during World War I. The Anzacs were met with fierce resistance from the Turkish forces and ultimately suffered heavy casualties. In total, more than 11,000 Anzacs were killed and over 23,000 were wounded.

The Anzacs withdrew from Gallipoli in December 1915 but their sacrifice is remembered every year on Anzac Day.

Anzac Day has since become a national day of remembrance in Australia and New Zealand. It is observed on April 25th each year and commemorates all Australians and New Zealanders who have served in wars, conflicts, and peacekeeping operations. Anzac Day is also a time to remember the suffering of all those who have served.

In Australia, Anzac Day dawn services are held at war memorials and cemeteries across the country. The Australian War Memorial in Canberra holds a special Anzac Day service which is attended by the Prime Minister and other dignitaries. After the dawn service, a march of veterans and current servicemen and women takes place through the streets of Canberra.

In New Zealand, Anzac Day is also marked with dawn services, marches, and two minutes of silence. Anzac biscuits are traditionally baked on Anzac Day and eaten as part of morning tea.

 

Anzac Day Facts

Also calledMāori: Rā o Ngā Hōia
Observed byAustralia
Christmas Island
Cocos (Keeling) Islands
Cook Islands
New Zealand
Niue
Norfolk Island
Tokelau
Tonga
TypeCommemorative, patriotic, historic
SignificanceNational day of remembrance and first landing of the Anzacs at Gallipoli
ObservancesDawn services, commemorative marches, remembrance services
Date25 April
Next time25 April
FrequencyAnnual
Related toRemembrance

How to celebrate Anzac Day

There are many ways to celebrate Anzac Day. In Australia, Anzac Day dawn services are held at war memorials and cemeteries across the country. The Australian War Memorial in Canberra holds a special Anzac Day service which is attended by the Prime Minister and other dignitaries.

After the dawn service, a march of veterans and current servicemen and women takes place through the streets of Canberra.

In New Zealand, Anzac Day is also marked with dawn services, marches, and two minutes of silence. Anzac biscuits are traditionally baked on Anzac Day and eaten as part of morning tea.

Anzac Day is a day to remember all those who have served our countries in wars, conflicts, and peacekeeping operations. It is also a day to commemorate the suffering of all those who have been affected by war.

Anzac Day is observed on April 25th each year in Australia and New Zealand. There are many ways to celebrate Anzac Day, including attending dawn services, marches, and eating Anzac biscuits.

Let us never forget the sacrifice of those who have served our countries.

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